Roasted Corn-On-The Cob With Husk On

No grill?  No problem.  Like holding the husk while eating your corn on the cob?  No problem.  Want flavor on your corn on the cob?  That's covered here too.

This is all really quite easy to do.

 baked corn on cob with husk

baked corn on cob with husk


The Recipe
Pre-heat oven 350 degrees

Ingredients:

  • Fresh corn on cobs, husks still on.

Preparation:

Pull off excess corn silk at the end of the cob.  Rinse off the cobs.  Place cobs in a pan and fill with sufficient water to cover tops of the cobs. Soak cobs for at least 35-40 minutes.

Drain off water and place cobs on a baking sheet.  Place cobs in the oven on the center rack.  Bake for 35 minutes or until corn feels soft when you press on the cob.

When ready, pull the husks back.  Pull off a long husk leaf and use to bundle and tie the remaining husk leaves.  This makes a great handle while eating the corn.  Pull off all silks.  Butter, salt and pepper to taste.


You may also be interested in trying your roasted corn-on-the-cob with this finishing butter:

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Plan on trying it out?  Let me know that too in the comments.  
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Fork Smashed Red Potatoes

Fork smashed red potatoes has the wonderful textures of being lumpy and smooth with the added flavors of Vidalia onions and lots of garlic. Want more flavor?  Just add shredded sharp cheddar cheese., garnish with sour cream or as I did here, add bacon bit.

This side dish is quick and easy to make.  And it's a great escape from making labor-intensive, fluffy smooth mashed potatoes but still offers appetite satisfaction when eating potatoes. 

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Leah Brakke, in her article "10 Healthy Reasons To Dig Into Red Potatoes," writes that it can lower stress levels; increase energy; is naturally fat and gluten free; and can contribute to healthy blood pressure.  You can get more details in her article at Black Gold Farms.

Leave the skin on!

Much of the nutritional value of a potato is found in its skin. Red potatoes are particularly healthy because of the thin, nutrient filled skins, which are loaded with fiber, B vitamins, iron and potassium. Half of the fiber of a potato comes from the skin. On red potatoes in particular, the skin is already super thin, so it doesn’t detract from the taste or texture.
— Leah Brakke
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Just wash the potatoes, remove the little eyes and brown skin patches (if needed); cut into fourths; and throw into a heavy stock pot.  Roughly chop half a Vadalia onions; peel garlic cloves; add these to a pot; and boil until tender.  

cut-red-potatoes.jpg

The Recipe
Yields 6 cups

Ingredients:

  • 6 small red potatoes, washed and quartered
  • 1/2 large Vidalia onion, roughly chopped
  • 6 whole garlic cloves
  • 2-1/2 cups of water
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 3 Tablespoons of milk for additional moisture (optional)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Suggested garnish:  crisp bacon bits, shredded sharp cheddar cheese or a large dollop of sour cream.  Garnish is optional

Preparation:

Add the first four ingredients to a heavy stock pot.  On high heat, bring water to a high rolling boil.  Lover heat to medium and continue to boil for 20 minutes or until red potatoes are fork tender.

Drain off excess water but retain just a little water, approximately 3 Tablespoons to 1/4 cup.  The retained water adds a bit more moisture.  Add the butter, salt and pepper. Using a fork, smash and gently stir the potatoes, onions and garlic.  If you decide to add shredded sharp cheese, gently stir it in after smashing the potatoes.


ENJOY!!

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